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Replacing Demographic Analysis with Something Else

June 11, 2013

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Sometimes I think a demographic analysis is the bane of my existence. Endless bivariate comparisons of various independent variables against the questions asked in the survey. Tedious, often of tenuous value, and, of course, subject to problems of collinearity. Demographic characteristics are not independent of each other. Saying that older people are more likely is […]

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Questions I Hate on Surveys: A Continuing Series

April 15, 2013

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I spend a lot of time on the Internet, as you probably do as well. It is there in the background when I am working, it is in my pocket when I am walking, it is playing music in the kitchen as I prepare dinner, and it is sending me alarms and notices. When I […]

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We all want relevant advertising.. so what?

July 17, 2012

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Do you want companies to send you or expose you to irrelevant ads? I think not. But maybe this intuition of mine is wrong. What is needed is a scientific study. Thankfully, SAS and Leger Marketing asked some questions on this topic recently. They found that: 60% of online Canadians agree that “I would like to receive offers and promotions […]

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Two Things to Take Away From the Recent Poll Failure? in Alberta

April 24, 2012

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There will be much hand wringing, considerable hyperbole, and lots of pseudo theories/ explanations for why the polls did not foresee the Conservative majority coming in the 2012 Alberta provincial election. Some attention will inevitably be placed on the methodological rigour of the polling methods but the size of the difference between the polls and the outcome is stunning. […]

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Does your scale have a tipping point? Questionnaire Design

March 20, 2012

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Question scales come in two types: seesaws and stairs.  The main point of differentiation of the two ideal-types is the presence or absence of a tipping point. See saws have them and stairs do not. When you are thinking about a scale, you need to ask yourself is there a point on the scale that […]

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