Tag Archives: methodology

Replacing Demographic Analysis with Something Else

June 11, 2013

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Sometimes I think a demographic analysis is the bane of my existence. Endless bivariate comparisons of various independent variables against the questions asked in the survey. Tedious, often of tenuous value, and, of course, subject to problems of collinearity. Demographic characteristics are not independent of each other. Saying that older people are more likely is […]

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Questions I Hate on Surveys: A Continuing Series

April 15, 2013

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I spend a lot of time on the Internet, as you probably do as well. It is there in the background when I am working, it is in my pocket when I am walking, it is playing music in the kitchen as I prepare dinner, and it is sending me alarms and notices. When I […]

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Does your scale have a tipping point? Questionnaire Design

March 20, 2012

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Question scales come in two types: seesaws and stairs.  The main point of differentiation of the two ideal-types is the presence or absence of a tipping point. See saws have them and stairs do not. When you are thinking about a scale, you need to ask yourself is there a point on the scale that […]

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The “Magic” of the First Question

November 7, 2011

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In the market research, the first question has incredible magic. Like the first sentence in a paragraph or the first line of a movie, that first question can grab the attention or put the respondent off. In addition it can give us more and better information. The magic of the first question is derived from […]

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Paranoia, Lying and the Unwanted Respondent

September 13, 2011

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Clients continue to want to ask people if they are a member of certain, unwelcome groups at the beginning of surveys so that they can exclude them. If you or someone in your family works in market research, advertising, or marketing, chances are, your participation is not welcome. The practice of screening out people based on their association […]

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